The Mission:

To build tomorrow's workforce today through business-driven partnerships and programs.

 

The Vision:

Every business has the skilled workforce that it needs to succeed.


The WEC’s History:

In 2012, the Simi Valley Chamber of Commerce Economic Development Committee formed a Workforce Education Subcommittee to introduce high school students to STEM and vocational career opportunities. Data collected from these early efforts confirmed extraordinary results and demand for workforce development programs. In order to respond to the region’s workforce pipeline needs, the Workforce Education Coalition (“WEC”) was independently incorporated in 2014 to serve all of Ventura County. The WEC received its 501 (c) (3) designation in 2015.


The Challenge:

Unemployed Millennials

Over the past 12 years, the United States has gone from having the highest share of employed 25 – 34 year olds among wealthy economies to having among the lowest share.
– The Idled Young Americans, David Leonhardt 2013

Shifting Skills Demands

According to a Harvard University report, in 2018, only 33% of all jobs will require a 4-year degree. 57% of jobs wll require a skilled credential or associate degree.
– Huffington Post, April 4, 2014

Skills Gap

"... there are jobs out there, but people applying for the positions aren't qualified."
- Cheryl Moore, Executive Director Ventura County Workforce Development Board, Simi Valley Acorn, Jan 2, 2015

Misalignment of Education and Jobs

A misalignment of education and jobs causes half of college graduates to be underemployed.
– Success in the New Economy, Brian Y. Marsh 2014

 


WEC programs are designed to achieve this mission by:

  •  Showing students how STEM subjects in school relate to careers.
  • Introducing students and teachers to a variety of workplace settings and career options within industry sectors.
  • Identifying the training needed during and after high school to succeed in careers
  • Providing opportunities for teachers and students to speak with business owners, managers and employees about required skills, pay scale, opportunities for promotion, and working conditions.


Results:

At the conclusion of each program, the WEC asks all participants to complete anonymous surveys. Feedback from WEC surveys consistently demonstrates that:

  • WEC programs show students how the STEM subjects that they study in school relate to the careers that they are interested in pursuing.
  • WEC programs introduce students and teachers to new career alternatives. Participants gain a better understanding of the variety of workplace settings and career options available within industry sectors.
  • Students learn what training they need during and after high school to succeed in their chosen career. Relevant programs at local training institutions, community colleges and four year universities are identified for student exploration.
  • Teachers and students get the chance to speak with business owners, managers and employees about required job skills, pay scale, opportunities for promotion, and working conditions.